Easy way out

I wish there was a 7-day gap where I can think about nothing but the best music, my favourite friends, easy cigarettes, yummy food, endless drinks and mind-bending toys. I was thinking of this in the context of 'avoiding the relentless amount of work thrown at my face', but at this very second, I realised: can't I do that as part of my work?

For the past 5-10 years, all the cliched, formulated plots in anime really contributed to my jadedness and Sid's resentment of otakus. Then I saw Cromartie High, and then I was reminded why I got into Anime in the first place. Everything I like about it is because of that Japanese sense of humour which you can't find elsewhere.

This entry was written by Jackson Chew, posted on April 30, 2009 at 12:22 pm, filed under plasmo and tagged , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Is this the best time for small companies to recruit?

Well, the economy wasn't as strong as it used to be. This means that companies are cutting back on staff, which means that more people, especially young and less-experienced ones, may miss out on getting jobs.

Does this mean this is the best time for small companies to recruit? That there are more bright minds out there in the job market then there either will be, who may be willing to work for less to seek potential opportunities within growing companies?

I'm sometimes overwhelmed by the possible prospects if the strengths of all the bright minds in my industry got together, it can create something pretty phenomenal in Australia. Now I feel slightly uneasy as this thinking may be an insult to the founding fathers of capitalism.

One of the largest things holding back one of my projects is the inability to recruit, attract or keep excellent staff. My business colleagues are suffering the same problems as well , and I think it's one of those things that all businesses need to take into account. It also doesn't help that the market in which my company caters for does not attract the brightest of young people (and if they are bright, they move on very, very quickly). It is rather frustrating. It makes me wonder if I should join them and move onto something else.

This entry was written by Jackson Chew, posted on April 19, 2009 at 10:08 am, filed under Blueprints and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Det snurrar i min skalle

By swedish indie-techno man, Johan T Karlsson aka Familjen. This video won a web competition. Great videos + great sounds = great everything.

This entry was written by Jackson Chew, posted on April 14, 2009 at 2:17 am, filed under Food for your ears and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



I could never be a dancer

By outfit Yuksek. Most known for 'Tonight', a slightly more upbeat track.  I love this particular sidetrack on the same album; amazing and simple stuff.

The lead-up around 1:12 blew my pants off.

This entry was written by Jackson Chew, posted on April 13, 2009 at 9:56 am, filed under Food for your ears and tagged , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



‘If you can’t advertise yourself, you can’t advertise anything.’

Fei suggested I watch a documentary on SBS on 'mad men', a label used to describe advertising pioneers in the early 90s (edit: came from men who worked on Madison Ave in New York, where all the world's biggest ad agencies are - Fei)  . The documentary was to be followed by a drama series based on the same era/ context next week. The particular focus was on a gentleman by the name of David Ogilvy. Very interesting insight; had I've seen this earlier, I might've pursued that marketing major!

The Hathaway Man; Selling a Simple Shirt using an Eye Patch

The Hathaway Man; Selling a Simple Shirt using an Eye Patch

  • Research: Coming, as he did, from a background in research, he never underestimated its importance in advertising. In fact, in 1952, when he opened his own agency, he billed himself as Research Director.
  • Professional discipline: "I prefer the discipline of knowledge to the chaos of ignorance." He codified knowledge into slide and film presentations he called Magic Lanterns. He also instituted several training programs for young advertising professionals.
  • Creative brilliance: A strong emphasis on the "BIG IDEA."
  • Results for clients: "In the modern world of business, it is useless to be a creative, original thinker unless you can also sell what you create."

Extract taken from David Ogilvy's wikipedia entry.

Entrepreneurship, from all levels, whether it's advertising, selling, logistics, resources: is a craft.

This entry was written by Jackson Chew, posted on April 9, 2009 at 8:01 pm, filed under Blueprints and tagged , , , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.